Photo 15 Apr 295 notes vanityfair:

Too Rich, Too Thin, Too Tall?
As shadows creep across Central Park, Paul Goldberger looks at the construction, architecture, and marketing of new super-luxury, high-rise condos, gauging their effect on New York City’s future—and its skyline. Read the story here.
Photograph by Stephen Wilkes. 

vanityfair:

Too Rich, Too Thin, Too Tall?

As shadows creep across Central Park, Paul Goldberger looks at the construction, architecture, and marketing of new super-luxury, high-rise condos, gauging their effect on New York City’s futureand its skyline. Read the story here.

Photograph by Stephen Wilkes. 

Photo 15 Apr 1,919 notes 
it rains when you’re here and it rains when you’re gone

it rains when you’re here and it rains when you’re gone

(Source: timeerasingyou)

Photo 15 Apr 3,526 notes fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Newton’s third law says that forces come in equal and opposite pairs. This means that when air exerts lift on an airplane, the airplane also exerts a downward force on the air. This is clear in the image above, which shows a an A380 prototype launched through a wall of smoke. When the model passes, air is pushed downward. The finite size of the wings also generates dramatic wingtip vortices. The high pressure air on the underside of the wings tries to slip around the wingtip to the upper surface, where the local pressure is low. This generates the spiraling vortices, which can be a significant hazard to other nearby aircraft. They are also detrimental to the airplane’s lift because they reduce the downwash of air. Most commercial aircraft today mitigate these effects using winglets which weaken the vortices’ effects. (Image credit: Nat. Geo./BBC2)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Newton’s third law says that forces come in equal and opposite pairs. This means that when air exerts lift on an airplane, the airplane also exerts a downward force on the air. This is clear in the image above, which shows a an A380 prototype launched through a wall of smoke. When the model passes, air is pushed downward. The finite size of the wings also generates dramatic wingtip vortices. The high pressure air on the underside of the wings tries to slip around the wingtip to the upper surface, where the local pressure is low. This generates the spiraling vortices, which can be a significant hazard to other nearby aircraft. They are also detrimental to the airplane’s lift because they reduce the downwash of air. Most commercial aircraft today mitigate these effects using winglets which weaken the vortices’ effects. (Image credit: Nat. Geo./BBC2)

Photo 15 Apr 843 notes amnhnyc:

If the sky is clear during early morning hours of Tuesday April 15, viewers in the Eastern time zone will see a full lunar eclipse beginning at 3:07 am and ending at 4:25 am. By coincidence, that night, Mars will be the brightest it’s been since 2007 and won’t be again until 2016.
Learn more from the SKY REPORTER.

amnhnyc:

If the sky is clear during early morning hours of Tuesday April 15, viewers in the Eastern time zone will see a full lunar eclipse beginning at 3:07 am and ending at 4:25 am. By coincidence, that night, Mars will be the brightest it’s been since 2007 and won’t be again until 2016.

Learn more from the SKY REPORTER.

Photo 15 Apr 1,590 notes 
(x)
(x)

(Source: palegingerbabies)

Photo 15 Apr 496 notes oupacademic:

We’re sharing this brain-stumper from David Acheson, author of 1089 and All That: A Journey into Mathematics:
Write down a 3-figure number. Any such number will do, provided the first and last figures differ by two or more.
Now reverse your number, and subtract the smaller 3-figure number from the larger.
Finally, reverse the result of that calculation, and add.
Then the final answer will always be 1089, no matter which number you start with!
(via What’s the Problem with Maths? | OUPblog)

oupacademic:

We’re sharing this brain-stumper from David Acheson, author of 1089 and All That: A Journey into Mathematics:

  1. Write down a 3-figure number. Any such number will do, provided the first and last figures differ by two or more.
  2. Now reverse your number, and subtract the smaller 3-figure number from the larger.
  3. Finally, reverse the result of that calculation, and add.
  4. Then the final answer will always be 1089, no matter which number you start with!

(via What’s the Problem with Maths? | OUPblog)

Video 15 Apr 220 notes
Photo 15 Apr 27,556 notes ibmblr:

A bottle of red made with data.Finding the perfect wine used to mean going to a good wine store, discussing your future meal with a sales person and trying to remember the wine the next time you buy. Now all you have to do is go to a website, like that of Bordeaux-based fine wine merchant Millesima. With data, they can help any customer, anywhere in the world, select the right bottle, for the right meal, the right climate, time of year, you name it. Plus you don’t have to soak off the label to remember the name and vintage when you want to buy it again. Explore more stories →

ibmblr:

A bottle of red made with data.
Finding the perfect wine used to mean going to a good wine store, discussing your future meal with a sales person and trying to remember the wine the next time you buy. Now all you have to do is go to a website, like that of Bordeaux-based fine wine merchant Millesima. With data, they can help any customer, anywhere in the world, select the right bottle, for the right meal, the right climate, time of year, you name it. Plus you don’t have to soak off the label to remember the name and vintage when you want to buy it again. Explore more stories →

via Proof.
Video 8 Apr 2,788 notes

flavorpill:

Just some morning beauty to get you through the day: Beautiful Closeup Photos of Butterfly Wings

via Proof.
Video 8 Apr 5,894 notes

(Source: nyotasinthesky)


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